Les operations de maintien de la paix: Le réalisme confronté aux ambitions

Global Peace Operations Review, Center for International Cooperation (CIC) Les operations de maintien de la paix: Le réalisme confronté aux ambitions By Alexandra Novosseloff 20th August 2015 Arriving at a time of “growing pains” in UN peacekeeping, the HIPPO was expected to clarify the relationship between today’s peacekeeping operations and the peacekeeping principles. However, the report fails to do so with sufficient clarity. It can however be praised for bringing up the important recommendation to improve triangular consultations, which should be more efficient and targeted to key TCCs. While the panel does discuss the need for an improved comprehensive strategy and a more equitable burden-sharing system through the report, these are other important points that remain vague. Overall, the recommendation mentioned in the report to a large extent echo unaddressed concerns mentioned by the Brahimi-report 15 years ago. It is therefore important that the implementation report of the Secretary-General helps to uphold the momentum for reflection on UN peacekeeping operations, which is fitting to coincide with the organization’s 70th anniversary. Read...

70 Years: Is There a Future for UN Peace Operations Given the Hypocrisy of the International System?

The Citizen 70 Years: Is There a Future for UN Peace Operations Given the Hypocrisy of the International System? By Lt General Satish Nambiar August 18, 2015 The recommendations stated in the HIPPO-report add little new to the ones already brought up by Agenda for Peace (1992) and the Brahimi Report (2000). Situations where there is a “designated enemy” or the “preemptive use of force” is needed, should be led by multi-national forces under an agreed lead nation or organization, and are not suitable as UN peace operations. The role of the UN should focus on preventive action, in particular preventive deployment, which the HIPPO does not address. Furthermore, the report makes a weak attempt at recommending the need to set up a standing rapid deployment force, which is imperative for new environments of peacekeeping. Read...

Can the UN Reduce Global Conflict?

Global Peace Operations Review, Center on International Cooperation (CIC) Can the UN Reduce Global Conflict? By Sarah Cliffe August 11, 2015 The peace operations- and peacebuilding reviews are insufficient responses to the challenges the UN is facing. Their weakness lies in too broad ideas on a spectrum of international action, that do not seem to be fully enough developed, as well as the failure to address violent extremism within the broader message of increased conflict prevention that both reports argue. The Secretary-General’s response is expected to further the “consensus on some practical building blocks at the UN” to implement the ideas mentioned in the reports. Read...

The AU Peace and Security Council on the HIPPO Report

African Union Peace and Security Council The 532nd meeting of the AU Peace and Security Council on the Report of the High-Level Independent Panel on United Nations Peace Operations (HIPPO): “Uniting our Strengths for Peace, Politics, Partnerships and People”. Press Release August 10, 2015 The Council welcomed the four strategic shifts proposed by the HIPPO, and expressed support for the principles recommended to underpin a peacekeeping partnership between the UN and the AU. The Council will be working on lessons learned on the transitions from AU to UN peace operations (CAR and Mali), and will seek to develop a set of benchmarks to be used in contexts of transitions. Read...

A Background to the Report of the High-Level Panel on Peace Operations

Global Peace Operations Review, Center on International Cooperation (CIC) A Background to the Report of the High-Level Panel on Peace Operations By Jean Arnault August 6, 2015 The HIPPO-report can better be understood by placing it within its historical context, and comparing it to the previous attempts to review peace operations, the Agenda for Peace (1992) and the Brahimi report (2000). The three reports present different perspectives on three key issues: the use of force and the principles of peacekeeping, peacebuilding, and the challenge of having no peace to keep. While the issues covered in the Brahimi and HIPPO-reports are “strikingly similar”, the more cautious approach considered in the 1992-report serves to a larger extent as a frame of reference: Robust mandates are in some cases necessary, but must be treated with care. The importance of accommodating the centrality of negotiated political solutions to internal conflicts is the key concern of the HIPPO-report, both to strategic and practical reasons: A new multi-actors response is needed as UN peacekeeping cannot be a substitute to the creation of a “global-regional peace and security framework”. Read more   Jean Arnault (France) Most recently, Mr. Arnault has been a professor at Sciences Po Paris focusing on mediation and settlement of civil wars. He previously served as United Nations Special Adviser to the Group of Friends of Democratic Pakistan; Special Representative of the Secretary-General in the United Nations Observer Mission in Georgia (UNOMIG); Special Representative of the Secretary General in the United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA); Representative of the Secretary General for Burundi and Head of the United Nations Office in Burundi...
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